Is it wrong to rehome the dog

LuckyEightWow
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At what point? I wouldn’t. If the dog is a hound you still have a few years of puppyhood, and usually calm down. Dogs are for life, personally I don’t believe we get to have buyers remorse, and then just dump them on someone else.
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LuckyEightWow wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:27 pm At what point? I wouldn’t. If the dog is a hound you still have a few years of puppyhood, and usually calm down. Dogs are for life, personally I don’t believe we get to have buyers remorse, and then just dump them on someone else.
I would never have looked at the dog If they had said it was a hound or even has the possibility of it being a hound. My brother had hunting hounds. I have been round several of them.

I think trying to find it a home with room to run may be the best for the dog. I didn't like the dog before. I massively dislike it now. I can't see keeping a dog that I don't want to be around. It lost all freedom. It will be in its crate or outside locked In the run. I don't trust it.
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Given some things you've written, definitely rehome the animal to someone who wants it, and will take the time to train it.

Poor dog! 😞
just an old coot 😉🌵
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AZOldGal66 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 7:15 pm Given some things you've written, definitely rehome the animal to someone who wants it, and will take the time to train it.

Poor dog! 😞
It's been trained. We have worked with trainers. It has taken several training classes. It just doesn't listen if not on leash or alone for any amount of time.
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I disagree.
An owner-pet relationship isn’t much different than any other in the sense that if it’s negative, there’s really no reason to keep it going. Should someone really suffer 10-15 years because of a pet? And how good would it be for the pet to be just a nuisance? They could surely be happier in a different environment as well. They deserve that chance.
Even marriages sometimes end. I’m thinking no judge will say “oh, well, there’s no marriage regret! You did it, you sick it up for life!” And sometimes it just doesn’t work out.
My mom, who’s the most devoted and loving of dog owners got a dog that turned out to be the opposite of what she expected from the breed. At one point the dog bit my father pretty badly just because he was moving the dog dish. She had a friend that had developed a better relationship with the dog, so she gave it to her. Better for everyone, dog’s happier too. So why stick to it over some misguided sense of obligation?
LuckyEightWow wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:27 pm At what point? I wouldn’t. If the dog is a hound you still have a few years of puppyhood, and usually calm down. Dogs are for life, personally I don’t believe we get to have buyers remorse, and then just dump them on someone else.
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Momto2boys973 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:25 pm I disagree.
An owner-pet relationship isn’t much different than any other in the sense that if it’s negative, there’s really no reason to keep it going. Should someone really suffer 10-15 years because of a pet? And how good would it be for the pet to be just a nuisance? They could surely be happier in a different environment as well. They deserve that chance.
Even marriages sometimes end. I’m thinking no judge will say “oh, well, there’s no marriage regret! You did it, you sick it up for life!” And sometimes it just doesn’t work out.
My mom, who’s the most devoted and loving of dog owners got a dog that turned out to be the opposite of what she expected from the breed. At one point the dog bit my father pretty badly just because he was moving the dog dish. She had a friend that had developed a better relationship with the dog, so she gave it to her. Better for everyone, dog’s happier too. So why stick to it over some misguided sense of obligation?
LuckyEightWow wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:27 pm At what point? I wouldn’t. If the dog is a hound you still have a few years of puppyhood, and usually calm down. Dogs are for life, personally I don’t believe we get to have buyers remorse, and then just dump them on someone else.
Would you abandon a child that was a problem? Hopefully the answer is no. I equate a dog-human relationship more like a child-parent one. As you need to be there to teach the dog and spend time with the dog, like you would a child. I am thinking that OP did do training but did not follow up with it at home. She did not want the dog since square one and that is the problem. I would not say that it is a incompatibility thing but more about a utter distain for the animal and this will show on how the dog acts. In regards to the OP however, she does not have the time nor the patience for the dog, so it is best for her to find someone that would love and train the dog properly.

A dog digging in a garden is very common, and we need to teach the dog it is not right. We do this by going out with the dog and spending time in the area, when the dog goes near the garden we say no, and divert their attention on to something else. Make the outdoor experience pleasurable. As I suggested, spending time and doing things with the dog outside. Throwing a ball, doing sprint runs, doing basic training, but this takes work and dedication on the owner and OP is not willing to put the time in for this. Her solution is to crate the dog which will only increase these issues once the dog is left out and to their own devices. Makes me wonder if the dog is left alone outside and this is where she does the damage, because if OP catches the dog after the deed is done, it is too late. I also wonder if the dog knows the command "leave it". If mine goes near the garden I just say "leave it" and he walks away from it. It took me two weeks to train my dog to leave the garden alone, by being outside with him, letting him get close to the garden then walking up to him saying leave it, directing him away from the garden and repeat this procedure each and every time till it got to the point where he would primarily avoid the area and if he got near I just now need to say "leave it" and he walks away.

The other thing that stood out to me was this - her concern is for her garden, mine when my dog did it was the dog as pepper plant/tomato leaves are poisonous to dogs, thankfully mine chose the zucchini plants to go after.
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If dh and ds want to keep the dog they need to step up too. It isn't fair this all falls on op. I've been there done that when it was my ex's idea to get dogs and it sucks. I used to ride my bike with my dog, take him to the park and to swim which helped. But he was also easier to train than OP's dog. I like the idea of a course for him to run or get into agility training. But if ds and dh aren't going to help contain the dog in the run or work with him screw it. There needs to be a family meeting where op says you either step up or I rehome because I'm at my wit's end. AND you can fix my garden also.
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Momto2boys973 wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 11:25 pm I disagree.
An owner-pet relationship isn’t much different than any other in the sense that if it’s negative, there’s really no reason to keep it going. Should someone really suffer 10-15 years because of a pet? And how good would it be for the pet to be just a nuisance? They could surely be happier in a different environment as well. They deserve that chance.
Even marriages sometimes end. I’m thinking no judge will say “oh, well, there’s no marriage regret! You did it, you sick it up for life!” And sometimes it just doesn’t work out.
My mom, who’s the most devoted and loving of dog owners got a dog that turned out to be the opposite of what she expected from the breed. At one point the dog bit my father pretty badly just because he was moving the dog dish. She had a friend that had developed a better relationship with the dog, so she gave it to her. Better for everyone, dog’s happier too. So why stick to it over some misguided sense of obligation?
LuckyEightWow wrote: Mon Jun 10, 2024 4:27 pm At what point? I wouldn’t. If the dog is a hound you still have a few years of puppyhood, and usually calm down. Dogs are for life, personally I don’t believe we get to have buyers remorse, and then just dump them on someone else.
Different then any other what? Friends that aren’t working out is vastly different then a pet you brought home and (essentially) promised to take care of and provide for. It’s definitely not as high as a parent/child relationship buts not far below it.

Also, a dog that bites isn’t the same as a dog that’s simply being a pain in the arse dog. Even dogs that are deemed family friendly can be problem dogs. Like humans it’s sometimes the luck of the draw.
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Sounds like you are the one with the problem and you have copped an attitude. You need to find the correct trainer instead of resenting the poor dog. As for her age-didn't you look at her to see she had no teeth? Did you take the dog sight unseen? She is a puppy and is going to chew on things and be rambunctious! Give the dog a chance and realize that animals need time and training just as human children do.
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You have to do what is right for your mental health and the dog. You do not need anyone’s approval or shame.
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